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So long, farewell, adieu to you and you and you

We cannot believe how quickly the semester has gone by. We hope you have enjoyed your experience at BU London – we are so glad you were able to join us for the term.

Have a safe journey home and a very happy holiday.

With my very best wishes,

Christine (on behalf of the BU London staff)

London-Winter-Wallpaper

Obama-ology

The European premier of the Aurin Squire play at the Finborough, Obama-ology, recently staged at the Juliard School in NYC.

“I am black enough to get stopped by the police, and I’m sure as hell black enough to work on a campaign for the first African American who has a chance at being the leader of the free world.”

Check out this interview with one of the lead actors, Pearl Mackie:

Follow Warren, a recent graduate who starts his first job out of university on the 2008 Obama campaign. Idealistic, energetic, he quickly finds out that changing society isn’t nearly as straight forward as he hoped.

Tickets are £14. On from now till 20 December.

Conflict, Time, Photography @ the Tate Modern

The Tate Modern’s new exhibit on Conflict exhibits the impact of war on cities, small communities, and families as well as landscape.

Fait, by Sophie Ristelhueber. Kuwait, 1991. First Gulf War.

Fait, by Sophie Ristelhueber. Kuwait, 1991. First Gulf War.

Photos taken during and after the events (sometimes moments after, sometimes days, weeks, or even years after) by photojournalists depict the haunting, long-lasting affects of the atomic bomb on Hiroshima in 1945, the US bombing of the Taliban in Afghanistan in 2001,and shell-shocked soldiers in Vietnam.

Mushroom Cloud, Hiroshima by Toshi Fukada

Mushroom Cloud, Hiroshima by Toshi Fukada

Dresden, 1945, Richard Peters.

Dresden, 1945, Richard Peters.

The photos are ordered according to how long after the event they were taken by the photographer, connecting the viewer to the legacy of conflict rather than just the immediate effect.

Student tickets are £11.30. On from now until February.

Winter Festival @ the Southbank

Boasting its own Christmas market with traditional stalls, delicious food and drinks, and a Christmas Tree Maze, the annual Southbank Winter Festival is back.

Lit up against the Thames as a backdrop, the Soutbank sparkles like a holiday beacon. There are also alternative gift shops, carol singers, and other events going on.

London Eye & Festive Lights

London Eye & Festive Lights

Tree Maze

Tree Maze

Dum Dum Donutteries (baked, not fried)

Looking for some less guilty pleasure? Dum Dum Donuttery bakes their donuts, rather than deep frying them in oil (as is traditional) without loosing any of the flavour.

The original location in trendy Shoreditch’s Boxpark, produces donuts that are light and fluffy in a plethora of varieties – classically British ones like Banoffee (banana toffee), Creme Brûlée, and Almond & Pistachio. You can also find Dum Dum Donuts at nearby Harrods in the Food Hall.

Strawberries & Cream Donuts

Strawberries & Cream Donuts

Hot Chocolate

With Winter upon us, it seems an apt time to discuss hot chocolate – the perfect way cap off any Thanksgiving Feast (or any other winter meal!) The Evening Standard has its top 5 here.

Divas Can cook has a recipe here, using Nutella:

If you are more a of a traditionalist with your hot chocolate, the BBC has a recipe with vanilla pods and cinnamon sticks here while Jamie Oliver calls his “Epic”, right here.

Holidays Past

The Geffrye Museum on Kingsland Road, East London has a new exhibit on called “Christmas Past”. Admission is free and the museum though small, hosts a variety of other “Period Rooms” with historically accurate depictions of homes from the 1600s to the 20th century.

Christmas, 1935. Photo Courtesy of the Londonist.

Christmas, 1935. Photo Courtesy of the Londonist.

The museum (opened in 1914) by the then local city council. It museum was originally a house (built in 1714), built with funds from Sir Robert Feffrye, who the museum is named for.

Christmas, 1870; photo courtesy of the Londonist

Christmas, 1870; photo courtesy of the Londonist